Top Five Friday #11

Top Five Friday #11

5 More Travel Inspiring Books

I’ve touched on this subject once before, but books and travel are two things that I happen to be very passionate about.  I like to read about travel and read while I travel.  I read for travel inspiration and sometimes for travel validation (as in, YES! That’s it! That’s why all my money goes towards plane tickets and hotels!).  Whether the books are fiction or non-fiction, informative or not so informative, I’m happy if it is wanderlust-inducing.  Here are five more travel inspiring books to inspire your next adventure:

  1. “The Good Girl’s Guide to Getting Lost” by Rachel Friedman: I read this book on the way to and during my Washington, D.C. trip. I loved it so much.  Rachel Friedman writes in a way that makes you feel like she is sitting next to you, regaling her travel stories over wine.  The book tells of her travels to Ireland, Australia, and South America.  I loved the honesty she uses in her writing, it makes the whole story that much more relatable.
    The Good Girls Guide to Getting Lost, Rachel Friedman, Wanderlust, Travel Books
  2. “Footloose American” by Brian Kevin: This book details the adventures of the author as he follows the same path Hunter S. Thompson traveled through South America. In traversing through Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina, Uruguay, and Brazil, Mr. Kevin hopes to gain clarity and a new perspective on life in America.  Though it seems a little too factual at times, the adventures and mishaps he comes upon make it a fun read.
    The Footloose American, Brian Kevin, Wanderlust, Travel Books
  3. “American Gods” by Neil Gaiman: “Why is a theological science fiction book on this list?” you might ask. But, if you’ve read it you know that this book dances around the continental United States, detailing roadside attractions and doling out suspense.  It also deserves a place on this list because the author, a British man, traveled all over the U.S. by train and car to write this book with the knowledge he gained.
    American Gods, Neil Gaiman, Wanderlust, Travel Books
  4. “On The Road” by Jack Kerouac: Is it cliché that “On The Road” is on this list? Maybe, but it would also be weird if it wasn’t.  I read this book in San Francisco, which was pretty perfect considering that is where a lot of it takes place.  While at times Mr. Kerouac’s writing can lean towards pretension, the story is well-written and entertaining.  This book is a classic inspiration for travelers striking out on their own.
    On The Road, Jack Kerouac, Wanderlust, Travel Books
  5. “The Paris Wife” by Paula McLain: I read this historical fiction novel on the beaches of Miami.  It kept me so interested that I was sunburned by the time I was finished with it.  “The Paris Wife” is the story of Ernest Hemingway’s first wife, Hadley, and their time together in Paris, France.  The book is equal parts 1920s Paris glitz and wistful love story.  It’s an intimate and interesting look, fiction or not, into Mr. Hemingway’s private life.
    The Paris Wife, Paula McLain, Wanderlust, Travel Books

What are your favorite travel inspiring books?  Where have they inspired you to travel?

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